Why the European Court of Human Rights Would Do Well to Start Using Stereotypes as Evidence – A Critique of the Strasbourg Approach to Anti-Roma Police Violence Cases

By Emma Várnagy This post is based on a paper which I am thankful to have had the opportunity to present at the ‘Critical Approaches to Romani Studies Conference’ on 18 May 2022 organized by Södertörn University and Central European University. I am also grateful to my doctoral supervisor, Marie-Bénédicte Dembour, for generously commenting onContinue reading “Why the European Court of Human Rights Would Do Well to Start Using Stereotypes as Evidence – A Critique of the Strasbourg Approach to Anti-Roma Police Violence Cases”

Russia and the Strasbourg Court: evidentiary challenges arising from Russia’s expulsion from the Council of Europe

By Anne-Katrin Speck* Introduction It has been two months since Europe woke up to the horrific news that Russia had launched a brutal invasion of neighbouring Ukraine—two months during which Ukraine has seen immeasurable suffering and destruction, and two months which have dramatically changed Europe’s human rights landscape. It is no exaggeration to state thatContinue reading “Russia and the Strasbourg Court: evidentiary challenges arising from Russia’s expulsion from the Council of Europe”